The Week’s Five Best Albums, From Big K.R.I.T. to Todd Snider

The Week’s Five Best Albums, From Big K.R.I.T. to Todd Snider
Big K.R.I.T. “4 Eva N a Day” album cover (detail)
(Cinematic Music Group)

Every week we’ll rank the five best albums, with samples of reviews.

Big K.R.I.T.
“4 Eva N a Day”
Self-released

Mississippi rapper releases warm mini-masterpiece of a mixtape:

K.R.I.T.’s in that rarefied space – a deep, creative groove I tend to associate with Miles, ‘Trane, George Clinton/Parliament and maybe ‘Kast – where he relies on instinct, makes what he hears and leaves it to the listener to consume the material on his terms, not the other way around. —Gotty, Uproxx

Christian Mistress
“Possession”
Relapse

Captivating lady singer leads pack of classicist hard rockers:

If this band were in that bar in your town on a Friday night, most everyone would raise a sweaty can of a cold domestic and chase the word shit, fuck, or hell with an exclamation "yeah, that was awesome." —Grayson Currin, Pitchfork

Ceremony
“Zoo”
Matador

Punk aesthetes saw away at perfection:

Previous Ceremony discs were dervish blurs of nail-gun thrash. On ‘Zoo,’ Ceremony obliterate more discriminately, recalling the post-punk of Joy Division, the Fall and Wire – if those bands had spent more time in weight rooms than art galleries. —Jon Dolan, Rolling Stone

Sophia Knapp
“Into the Waves”
Drag City

Cliffie Swan singer strikes out on her own, with a little help from Bill Callahan:

[T]he record's AM gold-aping sheen is the aural equivalent of smearing a camera lens with Vaseline: these are tracks for dreamily circling a roller rink in tiny shorts, or gently waving your bell-sleeved arms in the air (see Stevie Nicks circa 1976). —Amanda Petrusich, Pitchfork

Todd Snider
“Agnostic Hymns & Stoner Fables”
Aimless

Angry dude makes “country music for liberals and nostalgists”:

More than any of his previous albums, on which Mr. Snider usually excoriates himself above all others, this one — among his best — is largely a genial catalog of working-class rage and revenge. —John Caramanica, The New York Times

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