He's Our Man: Banksy's Kissing Policemen Voted "The" Quintessentially British Artwork

He's Our Man: Banksy's Kissing Policemen Voted "The" Quintessentially British Artwork

A survey commissioned by The Other Art Fair has found out that Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy-14779">Banksy's stencil of two Bobbies locked in an embrace — first sprayed on the wall of a Brighton pub — is considered the artwork most representative of British national identity.

A thousand artists have taken part in the poll, which names Antony Gormley's 1998 "Angel of the North" second, Lucian Freud's 1995 "Benefits Supervisor Sleeping" third, and Tracey Emin's "My Bed" fourth. Despite the media frenzy surrounding his Tate Modern retrospective, Damien Hirst's shark "The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living," only comes sixth.

 

The selection is overwhelmingly contemporary. Turner's 1839 "The Fighting Temeraire" and Constable's "The Hay Wain" made the seventh and tenth place respectively.

The Other Art Fair, May 10 – 13, 2012, Ambika P3, London

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