See Highlights from Moscow's New Sex Museum, Where Art, Politics, and Coitus Engage in an Unholy Threesome

Last month saw the opening of Tochka G, Moscow's first sex museum, a motley collection of sex-themed artworks and historical objects that has been raising eyebrows — and the ire of authorities. The name, in case you were wondering, means "G Spot," and its founder, a former politician who is an outspoken critic of Vladimir Putin, sees buxom mermaids and penis statues as powerful weapons for freedom under a repressive regime.

The erotic art — big surprise — is often hilarious and bizarre. The main attraction, the Guardian reports, is "Wrestling," a 2011 oil painting by St. Petersburg-based artist Vera Donskaya-Khilko that depicts Barack Obama and Vladimir Putin engaging in man-to-man combat using their over-sized penises. Putin, however, has an advantage: twin schlongs, one red and the other green. According to the wall text, this is "a symbol of hyperpotency." "It's a very political work," a museum guide named Elena told the Independent. "Everything on here has a deep political meaning. I'm just not quite sure what exactly it is yet."

Other paintings on display depict men serving cocktails on their erect penises and mermaids with double sets of breasts, while the sculptural works include mating animals and two huge phalluses, measuring six and a half feet tall, that greet visitors at the museum's basement entrance. The collection also features international and historical objects, from ritual phalluses of Timor-Leste and Cameroon to American blow-up dolls. There are Soviet-era condoms ("From the Bakovsky Factory, Size 2, two rubles") and art deco-inspired Vaseline tins. The popular gift shop hawks stripper nesting dolls (each doll has one less item of clothing until the smallest one is completely naked).

For the museum's founder, Alexander Donskoi, the institution is more about freedom than about sex. Formerly mayor of the northern Russian city of Arkhangelsk, Donskoi landed in jail after announcing that he planned to run for president during Russia's last election. Before his arrest, he told the Telegraph that he was warned by a presidential envoy that he would face legal problems if he did not call off his campaign. Donskoi is as much a critic of the Russian Orthodox church, which has become allied with Putin's regime, as he is of the government itself. "I think the clampdown on freedom in Russia is also the result of the fact that the nation is steadily moving away from secular government and that Russian Orthodoxy has filled the empty space left by communist ideology," he told the Guardian.

While Moscow has a vibrant nightlife that includes strip clubs and brothels, sexual education is non-existent in Russian schools and sex is rarely spoken of publicly. Last week, a representative of the Moscow mayor's office expressed concern regarding the museum, and Donskoi acknowledged to the Guardian that it could be shut down at any time.

So is the sexual really political? The museum shop sells role-playing costumes such as Aeroflot flight attendants, Russian rail workers, and Communist-era Young Pioneers. But according to Donskoi, the biggest sellers are the tax police and prosecutor outfits. "It's a bit of a fetish, because everyone is scared of them most."